Wausau Pilot & Review asked all candidates in contested races to answer a series of questions, some of which were submitted by readers.

Five candidates are vying for three seats. The election is April 5.

Read their unedited answers below. Incumbents are listed on top. You can avoid scrolling by jumping to the challengers’ responses here.


Incumbents

James Bouché

James Bouché

Occupation:                Retired Educator (Teacher/Coach, Administrator)

Prior political experience, if any:    Incumbent WSD Board Member  

What are the three most pressing issues that the district faces today, and how would you address them?

  1. We need to help our students, families and teachers recover from the past two years which has devastated all of us. The pandemic has harmed all of us in many ways! We need to be prepared for these types of setbacks and obstacles as we move into the future. As a Board, we need to direct our administrators to have plans put in place so that we can appropriately respond academically in similar situations in the future.  
  2. We need a well thought out plan for the present and future, pertaining to our buildings and grounds. All options and possibilities need to be considered. Well maintained buildings need to be updated for the 21st Century; our newest buildings are more than twenty years old. The Board needs to direct the administration to create a well thought out plan that is transparent to our taxpayers and us! 
  3. As a Board member, I would like to see more presentations from our staff pertaining to the plan which implements and executes Response to Intervention (RtI) to close the Achievement Gap for which our students suffer. 

Members of school boards are often far apart from one another on issues that come before them. How would you work to find common ground with someone whose views you disagree with? 

Disagreement is necessary; understanding is imperative. As a Board we have been working with a consultant who has done a tremendous job helping all of us understand our many different points of view. We are moving in the correct direction. 

What will you do to ensure that students with disabilities are taught self-advocacy and self-determination skills so they can succeed in school and beyond? 

Having been an administrator in charge of special needs students and had the privilege to have worked with a group of parents, teachers and donators to start a Charter School for Autistic students, I am very happy to see that our Governor and legislators are working at the state level to help local communities do more for the students who are dealing with academic obstacles. Every student has the right to an opportunity for success. As a Board member, I would expect our new administrator in charge of Special Education would be helping us (the District) move forward into the 21st Century, directing and pursuing cutting edge pedagogies for teachers and learning platforms (techniques) for our students. 

A number of school boards nationwide have banned certain books from being taught in schools. Do you agree with that decision? Why or why not? 

As a long time, English Teacher, I believe all literature should be age appropriate and verified by the Department of Public Instruction (DPI) and by the local control curricula committees lead by our Directors of Elementary and Secondary Education. Personally, I do not believe in banning the Literary Classics: 

  1. Samuel Clemens (Mark Twain) – The Adventures of Tom Sawyer or The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
  2. Harper Lee – To Kill a Mockingbird
  3. J. D. Salinger – The Catcher in the Rye
  4. Etc.

Are there any books that are part of the current curriculum that you find problematic? 

The Directors of Elementary and Secondary Education have not brought any questionable material to the Board for perusal at this time.  

Do you believe that critical race theory is currently being taught in local schools? 

According to the questions asked of the Wausau School District Administration, the Wausau School District does not teach CRT. Similar questions have been asked of Executive Director John Ashley of the Wisconsin Association of School Boards (WASB), and his response was: “CRT is not a curriculum that is being taught in the state of Wisconsin.” 

Are there subjects that are not being taught in our schools that should be? What about subjects that are being taught, but shouldn’t be?

As an advocate and one who has studied through post-graduate degrees “Technology Enhanced Education,” I am ecstatic to hear we will be teaching in our Technology Education programs more Fabrication Classes known as “FabLabs!”  I am also happy to see that we are encouraging students to pursue jobs in the labor force by searching through software that explores the opportunities in the 16 Career Clusters and the 72 pathways to success. 

I would encourage us to teach more in alliance with State Statutes for American Indian Studies (Act 31). Knowing our state history and literature is very important; and studying literature written by a contemporary Native-American like Sherman Alexie would enrich our students’ education. 

Another subject area would be to teach the history of our Hmong Culture and other Asian-American, Pacific Island (AAPI) descendants. These histories would enrich our American History Classes immensely. 

I would encourage our Directors of Elementary and Secondary Education not to drop anything at this point in time; choice is important for our students and families.  

Positive views about the board dropped significantly from the 2019-2020 school year to the 2020-2021 school year. How would you improve the board’s image?

As I stated earlier, we are working with a consulting firm that has been helpful for all of us, administration and School Board. Knowing one’s job and objective is very important, along with understanding and respecting one another’s point of view. I look forward to great things for the Wausau School District: students, families, staff and taxpayers! 

What are your thoughts about the proposed facility needs referendum?

Maintaining buildings, grounds and infrastructure is imperative, but updating and remodeling for the 21st Century is a necessity. In the last twenty years, safety and security has changed in schools due to tragedies. Our newest building, Wausau East, was built and opened its doors in 2004. Our newest elementary schools were built and opened their doors before 2000. All of our buildings are well maintained, but they have not been updated. 

What else would you like voters to know about you?

I have a passion for this district; of my twenty-years of teaching, I spent twelve years right here in Central Wisconsin – Wausau as an Educator. This district educated my children and daughters in law, who all have been very successful due to the great education they received in the Wausau School District. This is my opportunity to give back to a city and district I love. 

Jon Creisher

Jon Creisher

Occupation: Director of Strategic Partnerships

Prior political experience, if any:

I have spent 11 months serving as a current school board member of the Wausau School District.

What are the three most pressing issues that the district faces today, and how would you address them?

I believe addressing the overall achievement gap and student success is one of the highest priorities this district faces.  The teaching staff and administration need to work together on ideas, think outside the box and collaborate to bring forward common sense solutions to address the achievement gap needs.  Student success should be a top priority in the district to prepare students to become productive members of society and their communities.  We need to provide educational opportunities that help our students identify their passions and talents so they can determine what additional education and careers they will pursue after graduating.  Our district and community, like so many others around the state and country, will be facing ongoing staffing/labor shortages that must be addressed.  Bringing forward a strategic and well thought out plan on how to address these trends so that WSD can recruit and retain our excellent teachers and staff will be vital to the long-term success for the district, our students and our community.  Additionally, I would like to address areas of opportunity to support our teaching staff to ensure they have the appropriate tools and skills necessary to properly teach our students well into the future.  This will involve bringing many stakeholders together to collaborate and bring forward solutions that ultimately will allow our students to thrive and succeed with strong student outcomes.  

Members of school boards are often far apart from one another on issues that come before them. How would you work to find common ground with someone whose views you disagree with?

Upon joining the school board last year, the Administration and Board worked with a local consulting firm with the objective to bring board members together on how to move forward and work in a professional manner. I believe, as a Board, we are moving in the right direction.  I will continue to work as I have always done in a respectful and professional manner.  Over the last two years I have sought feedback from teachers, parents, and administration staff to gain a better understanding of the needs and challenges within the district.  I have advocated for teacher bonuses and provided a lot of input and discussion with the current referendum.  I worked diligently along with other board members to implement COVID policy in line with other area school districts which allowed for improved learning and social and emotional needs to be met for all of our students.  I support ongoing and continued community engagement with parents, staff, students and taxpayers so that together we can bring forward solutions and a strategic vision that will ensure future success for the Wausau School District. 

What will you do to ensure that students with disabilities are taught self-advocacy and self-determination skills so they can succeed in school and beyond?

Having a son with special needs I understand the importance for providing educational services to our students and families who have disabilities and special needs.  I will continue to support our special needs programs and initiatives that support funding to help these students thrive and succeed in our district.  Likewise, I would look to district administration in charge of Special Education to continue to bring forward ideas and solutions that will benefit our students and families to promote successful student outcomes.    

Are there any books that are part of the current curriculum that you find problematic?

I am not currently aware of any specific books that are problematic in the Wausau School District.  I do believe that all books and curriculum should be content and age appropriate. 

Do you believe that critical race theory is currently being taught in local schools? 

CRT is not currently being taught in our school district and it does not belong in our district.

Are there subjects that are not being taught in our schools that should be? What about subjects that are being taught, but shouldn’t be?

I want to continue to focus on ensuring our students are receiving a well-rounded education based on the foundations of math, science, writing, reading and social studies.  The objective of any curriculum should be to prepare our students for their futures, to help them identify their strengths and talents and to assist them with exploring those talents and passions so they can pursue technical trades or higher education.  Curriculum that is near and dear to me involves math, engineering and technology.  I would like to personally get more involved with exposing students and staff to the many opportunities that exist in the world of manufacturing.  Many organizations locally have global reach and offer career opportunities in Engineering, Sales, Marketing, IT, Finance, Human Resources, Accounting, Logistics and so much more. 

Positive views about the board dropped significantly from the 2019-2020 school year to the 2020-2021 school year. How would you improve the board’s image?

Bringing forward a positive image for the school board and district is a very important aspect to improving the overall culture within the district and community.  Conducting meetings in a professional and respectful manner is crucial to demonstrating to the community that board members, as elected officials, and leaders in the community, have the ability to discuss topics in a professional manner.  How board members and staff conduct themselves in public and especially on social media must also align with expectations and board policies. 

What are your thoughts about the proposed facility needs referendum?

I support the current referendum as it addresses many needs and overdue maintenance requirements at our secondary schools.  The referendum primarily addresses needs at John Muir and Wausau West, two of our older buildings in the district.  I believe there is more work to be done to address concerning trends we face in the community and challenges we have with our elementary footprint.  Demographic shift, slowing and declining enrollment district wide and staff shortages need to be considered with the overall strategic direction of the district. 

What else would you like voters to know about you?

 I’m a passionate and hardworking individual who greatly values education and this community.  My wife and I decided to start our family here in Wausau and have spent the last 13 years raising our four amazing children in this wonderful community.  Last year I saw a need in our community that needed to be addressed to ensure the students and families of our district could better succeed.  I knew I could rise up to the challenge and work collaboratively with administration and teaching staff to bring forward solutions that would allow our students to thrive and heal.  I would ask voters to look at the character and actions of each individual candidate.  I’ve demonstrated the ability to conduct myself with respect and professionalism while on the school board, even if I disagree with fellow board members.  With your support and vote I hope to continue to move the district forward with confidence.  

Jane Rusch

Jane Rusch

Occupation: retired state correctional officer

What are the three most pressing issues that the district faces today, and how would you address them?

Staff morale, finances, misinformation. We need to listen more closely to our staff, I would love to have monthly meetings with our different staffing groups – or as often as they felt it was needed. 

Finances, we, as a board need to continue to let Madison know that yearly cuts are not a way to value education. We need to send letters from the board and meet with them to express our needs. 

Misinformation – all we can do is to put out the truth. 

Members of school boards are often far apart from one another on issues that come before them. How would you work to find common ground with someone whose views you disagree with?

For most issues I am more than willing to seek middle ground.

What will you do to ensure that students with disabilities are taught self-advocacy and self-determination skills so they can succeed in school and beyond?

Great question, in fifteen years I’ve never been asked this. As a parent that had students with Individual Education Plans (IEPs) and 504 plans it’s important that these students be taught these skills as they are the most vulnerable population we serve. I have always thought that this was being done but you wouldn’t be asking if it was, so I’ll make it a point to address this in the near future and make sure we improve.

A number of school boards nationwide have banned certain books from being taught in schools. Do you agree with that decision? Why or why not?

In the last fifteen years Wausau has had two book challenges and has chosen not to ban the book in question. None of the recent books I’ve read about being banned seem to rise to the level of needing to be banned or restricted. This is more of a parental choice.

Are there any books that are part of the current curriculum that you find problematic?

I haven’t had any complaints about any books and I don’t personally have any books on my radar.

Do you believe that critical race theory is currently being taught in local schools? 

Are there subjects that are not being taught in our schools that should be? What about subjects that are being taught, but shouldn’t be?  

First of all, CRT is a college level course, taught at a few colleges, I don’t believe it should be taught in K-12 schools.  I just want the truth to be taught. While I advocated for financial literacy to be added to the curriculum and was thrilled when it was added it could be more robust. As for something not to be taught, I can’t say I have anything in mind. 

Positive views about the board dropped significantly from the 2019-2020 school year to the 2020-2021 school year. How would you improve the board’s image?    

I am only responsible for myself and I will continue to do the boards work with positive intent for the betterment of all concerned.     

What are your thoughts about the proposed facility needs referendum?

We need this referendum to pass, it’s not what I would have presented. But the district will really be struggling if it doesn’t pass, the legislature decided decades ago this is how districts would fund building projects and large repairs.

When the board is planning a referendum they need be planning for future referendums. Past boards were looking at the elementary schools and having at least one each referendum getting a separate gym and cafeteria. Also, to seasoned board members offering each school some much needed attention makes it more likely the referendum will pass. The majority of this board ignored this process and went for the low hanging fruit. They opted to go with the secondary schools with the logic that all students will get a benefit from the secondary improvements even if they are in elementary schools. While I support the referendum wholeheartedly, the money spent on artificial turf could have been spent on educational needs. The turf could have been privately financed. When I asked what they would offer for the next referendum that would need to focus on elementary schools, I was offered no options, just, we’ll figure that out when we get there. Effective school boards need to have long term views, my experience informs my long term view.

What else would you like voters to know about you?

I am a product of the Wausau School District and moved back here so my children could go to school here too. When my oldest started school I started as a volunteer. I’ve dedicated my life to the education of the children of Wausau and am asking to continue for another three years.


Challengers

Kayley McColley

Kayley McCauley

Occupation: Behavioral Health Technician in the psychiatric hospital at North Central Health Care 

Prior political experience, if any:  

I don’t have political experience, however, I’m highly passionate about community organizing. I’ve helped to organize the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. events here in Wausau as well as the first-ever Juneteenth event, and a Black history book fundraiser to bring books to young people in our community to name a few things. 

What are the three most pressing issues that the district faces today, and how would you address them?

  • I have a strong desire to support educators in our district. Throughout the duration of the pandemic, I saw teachers’ safety and wellness being disregarded and their perspectives being devalued. Our educators are an asset to our community and we need to start listening to them. They know the gaps in our district and they know what resources they need to help students learn and be successful. As a board, I think it would be beneficial to meet regularly with teachers and/or actively utilizing survey results concerning district needs as a guide for decision making. 
  • According to the CDC, suicide is the second leading cause of death for ages 10-24. The rate of suicide among youth has increased nearly 60% between 2007 and 2018. The CDC also reports that youth suicide attempts soared during the pandemic. I have worked in the psychiatric hospital at North Central Health Care for the past 2.5 years, including in the youth hospital since its addition last fall. I see these statistics in action daily. A person’s age does not invalidate their pain. No one is “too young” to face mental illness or experience suicidal thoughts. Mental health conditions do NOT make anyone less human. The mental health of our young people needs to be taken seriously and prioritized. From my lens, that means allocating more funds for school counseling, social workers, and mental health awareness and education. 
  • We need to advocate to pay teachers more. I think that looks like advocating as collective board to Madison that the cuts to teacher pay have been detrimental. 

Members of school boards are often far apart from one another on issues that come before them. How would you work to find common ground with someone whose views you disagree with?

I feel one of my strong suits is being able to truly listen to other people, not just listening to respond. People are more receptive to compromise if they feel that their perspective is at least being heard and acknowledged. I recognize that board members will inevitably have different stances on issues than me, hence the need to have numerous voices on the board. Ultimately, I am hoping that the shared goal of serving and representing members of our community can remain the focus, especially during contentious topics. 

What will you do to ensure that students with disabilities are taught self-advocacy and self-determination skills so they can succeed in school and beyond?

I will advocate to pay our paraprofessionals well and include them in decision making like teachers to ensure they get the resources necessary to make sure these skills can be taught to students. I also think this coicides with my hope to have more funding for social service and counseling services. Wrap around services are particularly vital for students with disabilities. 

A number of school boards nationwide have banned certain books from being taught in schools. Do you agree with that decision? Why or why not?

Many of the books I’ve seen on the banned books list I have personally read include ‘The Hate U Give’, ‘Drama’, ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’, ‘Speak’, and ‘The Absolutely True Diary of a Part Time Indian’ to name a few. All of these books addressed various subject matter such as racial discrimination, LGBT+ people, and sexual assault. These are topics that are relevant to all of us, including students. We aren’t doing any favors by depriving students access to these books. These books provide a means for students to see their lived experiences affirmed. These books provide students who perhaps can’t directly relate to some of the aforementioned topics a chance to learn and consider an alternative perspective. Books are effective and practical tools for initiating critical conversations about subjects that matter. 

Are there any books that are part of the current curriculum that you find problematic?

To my knowledge I have not heard complaints of problematic books nor do I have any personal complaints. 

Do you believe that critical race theory is currently being taught in local schools? 

No, I do not believe critical race theory is being taught in schools. Critical race theory is something taught to postgraduate students, usually within the context of examining the intersection of race and law within the U.S. 

Are there subjects that are not being taught in our schools that should be? What about subjects that are being taught, but shouldn’t be?

I am proud to live in a town with a large Hmong population. I didn’t understand or fully know about how the Hmong people landed in Wausau until well into college. I don’t believe that was because I was a disengaged student, either. I have always been interested in history and cultural studies. I think it would be awesome if we could do more to teach about Hmong history in our schools. History that is culturally relevant to the community we live in is important. Did you know that we have a museum downtown with a collection of 400-plus Hmong and Laotian artifacts? It’s pretty awesome! It would be amazing to have students visit the museum and learn about the history of Hmong people as it relates to Wausau and beyond. At this time, I have no concerns about subjects being taught that shouldn’t be, but if anyone has concerns please don’t hesitate to reach out to me. 

Positive views about the board dropped significantly from the 2019-2020 school year to the 2020-2021 school year. How would you improve the board’s image?

My intention is to make informed decisions that are in the best interest of our community and students in our district. Hopefully through making smart choices that benefit the district the image will improve, but I would not define that as a priority for me or even my responsibility. I’m worried less about ‘looking good’ and more about doing good. 

What are your thoughts about the proposed facility needing referendum?

If I had been on the board when this referendum was created, I definitely would have had some suggestions about how to make the additions more equitable and beneficial for all students and families. That said, I also recognize the expansions this referendum would offer and we have facilities that need updates. I also think we need to think about future referendums and consider setting the stage to begin further repairs and building projects.

What else would you like voters to know about you?

I can proudly say I received my education in the Wausau School District from kindergarten through my 2018 graduation at Wausau West High School. I would be honored to serve the Wausau School District and be a voice for our community’s students, educators, and parents. Please consider following my candidacy page “Kayley McColley for Wausau School Board” which has more information about who I am and what I stand for. My email is KayleyforWSB@gmail.com. I care about your ideas and suggestions. It matters to me that you are heard. I believe the best way for me to represent you is by hearing directly from you. I have ideas, motivation, and a deep passion that I know can benefit my community. When I see a need, I seek creative solutions that are action and outcome-focused. I hope to show other people my age that with a little initiative, courage, and grit, we can ignite tangible, meaningful change. Thank you very much for reading about my candidacy. 

Joanna Reyes

Joanna Reyes

Occupation: Data Entry Analyst

Prior Political Experience: 

Active member of the public in school board meetings; meeting with almost every principal of the schools in the district since starting my campaign; engaging grassroot efforts to learn from all in the community by going door-to-door to discuss local issues; campaigning for continued progress in the Wausau School District; listening to the children within the district while staying apprised of the parents’ voices regarding each issue.

What are the three most pressing issues that the district faces today, and how would you address them?

Academic achievement; support for our teachers and staff; and community involvement.  The Wausau School District has all the right elements in location, opportunities, and culture.  There is no reason why the district is not the flagship model of academia in this great state.  Yet, we are on the verge of a new day.  As hope has dissipated in recent years, given an obsession of some to focus on issues that are simply just not top priorities to our student’s well-being and everyday lives, the voices of the public have fought back.  This is our time as a community to decide our future.  Listen to each other, integrate our common values, and align ourselves with a shared mission…make every student better.  We can accomplish amazing feats when we unite ourselves in positive dialogue and understanding when compromises are necessary.  Every single moment of every day is a war for our childrens’ futures.  The K-12 children of this district deserve every best opportunity we can provide them.  We accomplish all of these goals by working together in a positive fashion, instead of focusing solely on the negatives of our community, or encouraging discourse or defection from the discussion and/or even stating people should relocate themselves, their children, or otherwise from the area, as certain candidates have advocated.

Members of school boards are often far apart from one another on issues that come before them.  How would you work to find common ground with someone whose views you disagree with?

Listen…then listen more.  Precisely the reason I have gone door-to-door, not for purposes of campaigning alone – no, for purposes of my thirst to know what voters want and expect of an elected official in this school district.  I do not proport to know everything; the numerous people I have spoken with over the past year, before deciding and then announcing my candidacy, have educated me about one undeniable premise – we are so much more alike than we are different.  Yes, there are genuine differences in points of view, particularly on certain issues; but leading by example is how we show each other respect.  So, listening to each other; is the greatest example we can set for children of this district and also for general administration of the board’s duties to them.  But in the end, it is not about the board as individuals; it is about the voters who choose the board members to serve as public officers and gatekeepers of the community’s trust.  Thus, I would approach any issue with first listening to others.

What will you do to ensure that students with disabilities are taught self-advocacy and self-determination skills so they can succeed in school and beyond?

Having spoken with parents, having close relatives and childhood friends with children of special needs I am glad to see our governing bodies are acknowledging and supporting families with needs. I will support the district with programs and actions to support our students and families prosper. I will be supporting and looking to our director of special education to lead with ideas and efforts to help advance our students and families flourish in our district.

A number of school boards nationwide have banned certain books from being taught in schools. Do you agree with that decision?  Why or why not?

This is a great question.  I cannot speak, however, on behalf of the school districts this question alleges exists.  What I do know is that the Wausau School Board has not sought to impose such policies.

Are there any books that are part of the current curriculum that you find problematic?

No.

Do you believe that critical race theory is currently being taught in local schools?

Since announcing my candidacy I have visited almost every school and have asked principals about CRT in the classrooms, they have assured me that it is not being taught. In the current climate we as parents must be involved in our children’s learning and lives. If we want to know what they are learning, we must engage with our children and build relationships with our teachers.

Are there subjects that are not being taught in our schools that should be? What about subjects that are being taught, but shouldn’t be?

From my recent sit ins on the Wausau school board meetings, I have learned about Fabrication Laboratories also known as Fab Labs and the future of the program in our school district. FAB LABS teaches our youth how to work with the latest software technologies. It ensures that today’s students have the skills to compete for jobs of the 21st century by providing hands on learning in such areas as engineering, design and complex problem solving. As a parent of a child that enjoys being challenged with magnetic building blocks, Lego’s and really anything he can get his hands on to build with, I’m excited for these types of opportunities not only for his future in the district but for the future of our children and the possibilities to bring some employees to Wisconsin’s manufacturing companies that are in high demand. FAB LABS will also help our children learn about the different opportunities that are available for them as a career pathway.

Positive views about the board dropped significantly from the 2019-2020 school year to the 2020-2021 school year.  How would you improve the board’s image?

I agree.  Public confidence has improved significantly since the 2021-2022 school board began its tenure and faced head-on the negative perceptions it inherited due to the actions of the 2019-2020 and 2020-2021 school board years.  I hope, whether the public entrusts me with their vote of confidence to become a board member or not, that the board continues the incredible progress it accomplished over this past, 2021-2022 school year.

What are your thoughts about the proposed facility needs referendum?

Visiting the schools in the districts and meeting with the principals I have a better understanding of the needs and opportunities the much-needed upgrades and expansion would bring to these school. With the shifting demographic to the west, it is necessary to expand Wausau West and John Muir to better accommodate our children. Montessori which is located in the Horace Mann campus would also get much needed space that would then offer more opportunities for enrollment. Upgrading our schools from locker rooms, auditorium upgrades, additional classrooms and upgrading the technologies they are currently using will only better help our children advance in this world and will give our teachers and staff the tools they need to help teach our children.  If the community does not want to condense schools, we must find ways to preserve our schools and provide our children with the tools they need and the safety they deserve. Visiting the schools and witnessing the safety issues of the entrances leaves me very uneasy to think how easy it can be to enter some of the campuses.  It is very important that we make our schools safer for our children and faculty!

What else would you like voters to know about you?

There is little that intimidates me.  I am a mother of two young children with a vested interest in the future of this community.  I will not be swayed by politics or personal gain.  I am running for this position because I know the consequences of staying silent.  I understand that, as a woman and first-generation offspring with parents who emigrated from Central America, I am still a minority of a voice within the minority community in Wausau.  That too only inspires me to speak louder for all parents – only a mother could truly appreciate this dynamic, and I have met so many incredible mothers who have not only inspired but mentored me in untold capacities since relocating my family from Los Angeles, California to my husband’s hometown (Wausau) almost two years ago.  I know without a doubt, the parent-teacher relationship is the most instrumental influence on a child.  The school board facilitates that dynamic by ensuring accountability to the parents.  My mission is simple – allow a voice for all taxpayers in the district – preserve family-oriented policies – challenge any challengers to that process by not being silent or accepting ideas over empirical, and time-tested evidence for children’s best well-being.